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My Terms

Acute Withdrawal

Benzo Belly

CT - Cold Turkey

DP/DR - Depersonalization/Derealization

Globus Hystericus

Hypnagogic hallucinations

Interdose Anxiety

Paradoxical Reaction

Reinstating

Stabilizing

Tolerance Withdrawal

Up dose

Windows

Waves

Acute Withdrawal

That period of withdrawal during which your symptoms are the most pronounced, to the point that they interfere with daily life.

Benzo Belly

The bloated, distended, sometimes painful pot belly that develops during benzo withdrawal.

CT - Cold Turkey

Abruptly stopping or too-rapidly tapering your dose of benzodiazepines, as is done in many hospitals and detox centers. Also known as a "CT," or "CTing." This, for a variety of reasons, is a very bad idea.

DP/DR - Depersonalization/Derealization

Depersonalization: (psychology) A state in which the normal sense of personal identity and reality is lost.

Derealization: The feeling that things in one's surroundings are strange, unreal, or somehow altered.

Globus Hystericus (lump in the throat). Globus is the term given to the sensation of a lump in the throat causing difficulty with swallowing when there is no physical cause.

Hypnagogic hallucinations are vivid perceptual experiences occurring at sleep onset while hypnopompic hallucinations are similar experiences but occurring at awakening.

Interdose Anxiety

Interdose anxiety is an unreasoning, unreasonable rebound in anxiety that occurs between doses of benzodiazepines, as the first pill is wearing off but before you've taken or felt the effects of the next one.

Paradoxical Reaction

A paradoxical reaction to benzos means responding to the pills with the opposite of the intended reaction -- in general, the symptoms of a paradoxical response will be anxiety, panic, and rage.

Reinstating

Resuming benzodiazepine use after an unsuccessful withdrawal  in the hopes of stabilizing. This will let you taper anew in the hopes of having a better, more symptom-free outcome. This may or may not be successful.

Stabilizing

Experiencing the minimum amount of pain and symptoms possible before you begin cutting again. For some this will mean feeling normal, for most it will mean  feeling just OK enough to continue tapering.

Tolerance Withdrawal

A state of chronic, perpetual benzodiazepine withdrawal that is reached once your body builds resistance to a given dose, resulting in a constellation of  symptoms (including worsening anxiety) that temporarily improve as soon as you up dose. Once you have become tolerant to one dose, it is likely that you will become tolerant to the new up dose at some stage. This condition is also known as the "tolerance trap."

Up dose

To increase your daily dose of benzodiazepines in the hopes of stabilizing  either prior to starting a taper or during a taper if you have tapered too quickly and need to stabilize before re-tapering at a slower rate. This may or may not be effective.

Windows

Discrete periods during which you feel normal or well again. As you progress further in your healing, these get longer, more profound, and more consistent, until you finally feel like yourself again.

Waves

The period which occurs after you have had a window, where all or some o the symptoms come back again.

 

Disclaimer:  The information contained in this website was not compiled by a doctor or anyone with medical training. The advice contained herein should not be substituted for the advice of a physician who is well-informed in the subject matter discussed. Before making any decisions about your health or treatment you should always confer with your physician and it is always assumed that you will do so.

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Last updated 23 May 2013